Beta-Lactoglobulin (9045-23-2)

March 11, 2020
SKU: 71776-70-0
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β-Lactoglobulin is the major whey protein of cow and sheep’s milk (~3 g/l), and is also present in many other mammalian…….

 


Status: In Mass Production
Unit: 25kg/Drum

 

Beta-Lactoglobulin (9045-23-2) video

Beta-Lactoglobulin (9045-23-2) Specifications

Product Name Beta-Lactoglobulin
Chemical Name β-Lactoglobulin (LG); BLG; β-Lg
Brand Name N/A
Drug Class N/A
CAS Number 9045-23-2
InChIKey N/A
Molecular Formula N/A
Molecular Weight 18,300
Monoisotopic Mass N/A
Boiling point  N/A
Freezing Point N/A
Biological Half-Life N/A
Color White powder
Solubility  H2O: 10 mg/mL
Storage Temperature  2-8°C
Application β-Lactoglobulin A from bovine milk has been used:
• as a calibrant for the calibration of the TriWave device
• as a standard in the detection and quantification of β-lactoglobulin in bovine milk by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)
• in the purification and molecular weight measurement of protease samples
β-Lactoglobulin was used in the identification of the genetic variants of κ-casein in milk by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis.

 

Beta-Lactoglobulin (9045-23-2) Overview

β-Lactoglobulin is the major whey protein of cow and sheep’s milk (~3 g/l), and is also present in many other mammalian species; a notable exception being humans. About 20% of bovine milk proteins are whey proteins, with the main component being beta-lactoglobulin. β-Lactoglobulin is often the main ingredient in whey-based protein powders.

Whey proteins can be dangerous food allergens. Bovine milk is one of the most important allergenic food ingredients, especially for children. Consequently, the labeling of beta-lactoglobulin or milk is mandatory in many countries. Although there are no legal threshold limits for whey proteins, it is highly recommended that food manufacturers test for very low concentrations to protect allergic individuals and avoid allergen-related recalls.

What is Beta-Lactoglobulin ?

Beta-Lactoglobulin (ß-lactoglobulin, BLG) is the major whey protein in ruminant milk and is also present in the milk of other animals. About 20% of bovine milk proteins are whey proteins, with the main component being beta-lactoglobulin. Beta-Lactoglobulin is often the main ingredient in whey-based protein powders.

Beta-lactoglobulin is a globular protein of the lipocalin family.  It has a molecular weight of 18,300 and comprises 162 amino acid residues, including a relatively high proportion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs).

Beta-lactoglobulin (b-lactoglobulin/BLG) is one of the major allergens in cow’s milk. It is one of the most common proteins in milk to cause allergic reactions, although most individuals are typically allergic to more than one milk protein. BLG is the most abundant protein in whey, accounting for 50 percent of total protein in the lactoserum fraction and approximately 10 percent of cow’s milk.

In general, globulins are small proteins that fold up into a roughly spherical shape, and lactoglobulins are globulins present in milk. When casein is precipitated out of milk (for example, by rennet or acidity), the lactoglobulins remain behind in the whey (along with lactalbumin, lactose, minerals, and immunoglobulins). Proteins are about 10% of the dry solids of whey, and beta-lactoglobulin is about 65% of that 10%.

Alpha-lactoglobulin is involved in lactose synthesis. The purpose of beta-lactoglobulin is less clear, and although it can bind many small hydrophobic molecules, it’s main purpose may just be to act as a source of amino acids. Beta-lactoglobulin has also been shown to be able to bind iron via siderophores and thus might have a role in combating pathogens.

Beta-Lactoglobulin benefits

Facing the fact that Whey protein is a mixture of beta-lactoglobulin, alpha lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin, and immunoglobins.  People commonly use whey as supplementation, alongside resistance exercise, to help improve muscle protein synthesis and promote the growth of lean muscle mass.

Possible benefits include aiding weight loss, Anti-cancer properties, Lowering cholesterol, Asthma, Blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, Reducing weight loss in people with HIV.

Unlike the other main whey protein, α-lactalbumin, no clear function has been identified for β-lactoglobulin, this despite its being the biggest part of the fractional composition of the globular proteins isolated from whey (β-lactoglobulin ≈⁠ ⁠65%, α-lactalbumin ≈⁠⁠ ⁠25%, serum albumin ≈⁠⁠ ⁠8%, other ≈⁠ ⁠2%). β-lactoglobulin is a lipocalin protein, and can bind many hydrophobic molecules, suggesting a role in their transport. β-lactoglobulin has also been shown to be able to bind iron via siderophores and thus might have a role in combating pathogens. A homologue of β-lactoglobulin is lacking in human breast milk.

Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is the most abundant whey protein in bovine milk. LG has been widely studied in the food industry because of its nutritional and functional effects on various biological processes.

Additionally, BLG may be an inexpensive antioxidant nutrient that is easily and readily accessible. BLG may potentially act as an antioxidant nutrient that is easily accessible and cheap in daily life. Our previous report showed that the free cysteine of BLG plays a protective role in the antioxidant nature of milk. BLG is responsible for 50% of milk’s antioxidant activity. Not only can BLG act directly as an antioxidant nutrient, it can also carry other antioxidants via its ligand binding pocket. Thus, it increases both the bioavailability and amount of available antioxidants.

β-Lactoglobulin is the major whey protein in bovine milk accounting for about 50% of the proteins in whey but is not found in human milk. β-Lactoglobulin poses a variety of functional and nutritional characteristics that have made this protein a versatile ingredient material for many food and biochemical applications.

 

Beta-Lactoglobulin side effects

Beta-lactoglobulin (b-lactoglobulin/BLG) is one of the major allergens in cow’s milk. It is one of the most common proteins in milk to cause allergic reactions, although most individuals are typically allergic to more than one milk protein. BLG is the most abundant protein in whey, accounting for 50 percent of total protein in the lactoserum fraction and approximately 10 percent of cow’s milk.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction to beta-lactoglobulin may be:

Redness or hives

Itching

Nausea

Bloating

Stomach discomfort

Diarrhea

Swelling

Constipation

Anaphylaxis (rare)

 

Beta-Lactoglobulin powder uses

β-Lactoglobulin is the major whey protein in bovine milk accounting for about 50% of the proteins in whey but is not found in human milk. β-Lactoglobulin poses a variety of functional and nutritional characteristics that have made this protein a versatile ingredient material for many food and biochemical applications.

 

Reference:

β-Lactoglobulin heat-induced aggregates as carriers of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Perez AA, Andermatten RB, Rubiolo AC, Santiago LG Food Chem. 2014 Sep 1; 158():66-72.

Structure and allergenicity assessments of bovine β-lactoglobulin treated by sonication-assisted irradiation. Yang F, Zou L, Wu Y, Wu Z, Yang A, Chen H, Li X. J Dairy Sci. 2020 Feb 26

Genomic Analysis of Milk Protein Fractions in Brown Swiss Cattle. Macedo Mota LF, Pegolo S, Bisutti V, Bittante G, Cecchinato A. Animals (Basel). 2020 Feb 2